JPA Pitfalls – a Series of Serious JPA Obstacles

Most of our Java-based web-applications store their data in a relational database such as Oracle, PostgreSQL, MySQL, MariaDB or MS SQLServer. The standard way to access and modify the data is using an object-relational mapping as specified by the Java Persistence API (JPA). Over the years JPA has become a mature specification and there are a couple of JPA implementations with strong support such as Hibernate, EclipseLink, OpenJPA and DataNucleus. However, day-to-day project experience demonstrates there are number of pitfalls you might run into when using JPA.

pitfall

To avoid stumbling into the same pitfall again and again, we collected them with their solutions and presented these pairs of problems and solutions. This is a start of a series of blog articles each describing a pitfall and a way to circumvent it.

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Measuring the Lightweightness of Go by Looking at a Simple Web Service

Inspired by my article The lightweightness of microservices – Comparing Spring Boot, WildFly Swarm, and Haskell Snap, a colleague of mine implemented the same Web service using the Go programming language. You can find his code here: Bitbucket-repo. To compare his implementations with the other ones, I integrated it into the main project (GitHub-repo) and measured it. Here are the results. 🙂

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The lightweightness of microservices – Comparing Spring Boot, WildFly Swarm, and Haskell Snap

A microservice is an autonomous sub application for a strictly defined and preferably small domain. An application built from microservices is scalable, resilient, and flexible. At least, if the services and their infrastructure are well designed. One requirement on the used frameworks to achieve scalability and resilience is that they are lightweight. Lightweightness comes in different flavors. Microservices should be stopped and started fastly, and should consume few resources. The development and maintenance of microservices should be easy.

For this reason, in the Java world, Spring Boot is currently recommended as best choice regarding these requirements. Traditional Java EE application servers are too heavyweight, because they are not developed as basis for single services but as platform for running different applications simultaneously. Thus, they must be bloated.

Being a curious person I used some of my spare time in the last Christmas holidays to actually measure the lightweightness. First I chose Spring Boot and WildFly as “competitors”. I added WildFly Swarm which provides similar features as Spring Boot but is based on WildFly. Then looking at the requirements I decided to include a framework with a real small startup time in comparison to Java-based frameworks and chose Snap based an Haskell. For every framework I built a minimal micro service, wrapped it into a Docker container, and measured its weight.

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