Deploying applications continuously with SCP

The last blog post (Jumping into continuous delivery with Jenkins and SSH) demonstrated how to build and deploy an application continuously using Jenkins, SSH and Nexus. In that scenario, the application was packaged and deployed on Nexus by Jenkins, and then retrieved from Nexus by the host. However, what about doing it without Nexus? You might have no other need for Nexus or even Maven. Or perhaps you prefer to deploy your application only after you have tested it in several environments. So, how to deploy your application without Nexus?

This post explains how to use the Jenkins SCP plugin to copy the freshly built application to another machine using SCP. This is useful when you need to copy an application to a specific machine or another environment without exposing it publicly.

Although this post is focused on Jenkins, other continuous integration servers have equivalent capabilities.
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Building pipelines by linking Jenkins jobs

Continuous integration servers have become a corner stone of any professional development environment. By letting a machine integrate and build software, developers can focus on their tasks: fixing bugs and developing new features. With the emergence of trends such as continuous deployment and delivery, the continuous integration server is not limited to integrating your products, but has become a central piece of infrastructure.

However, organizing jobs on the CI server is not always easy.

This blog post describes a couple of strategies for creating dependent tasks with Jenkins (or Hudson).

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Provisioning Maven artifacts with Puppet

Our last blog post introduced how Puppet can be used to achieve Infrastructure-As-Code, and how to deploy Play applications following this practice. However, we didn’t address how the applications are actually copied to the host.

Apache Maven is a widely used build tool adopted by more and more companies to support their build process from compilation to deployment. Deploying, in the  Maven world,  means uploading the artifact to a Maven repository. Such Maven repositories are managed using Sonatype Nexus or JFrog Artifactory. However, this sort of deployment does not address the real provisioning of the application, i.e the deployment on the production servers.

This blog post presents a Puppet module to download Maven artifacts from a Nexus repository. This module closes the gap between the development team deploying their artifacts to a Maven repository, and the administration team responsible for installing and configuring the application.

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